Archive for August, 2007

FCC Chairman: Minorities Would Benefit From Cable Choice (Citizenlink.com)

Wednesday, August 29th, 2007

Federal Communications Commission Chairman Kevin Martin has written a letter to several minority groups saying that it would benefit their communities if cable subscribers got to choose channels a la carte.

In the letter, Martin pointed to a Nielsen study that shows the average American household gets 85 channels but only watches about 16, an experience that’s particularly true for the Hispanic community and other minorities.

But under an a la carte system, viewers would only pay for the channels they want, something that would also benefit families that don’t want to subsidize objectionable channels they’d rather not have in their homes.

Full story… 

San Francisco hopes to reverse black flight (USA Today)

Wednesday, August 29th, 2007
SAN FRANCISCO — Wayne Cooksey joined the flight of African-Americans from this city last year to escape soaring rents and buy a home. Michael Higgenbotham left six years ago for a safer neighborhood and better schools for his three children. Adell Adams retired and wanted to downsize but knew her home’s equity wouldn’t go far in a market where decent condos start at $500,000.

Aubrey Lewis was among the first to go, to nearby Oakland in 1977. “We left because of the housing situation,” says Lewis, 77. “And that was early. It hasn’t gotten much better.”

African-Americans are abandoning this famously progressive city at a rate that has alarmed San Francisco officials, who vow to stop the exodus and develop a strategy to win blacks back to the city. In June, Mayor Gavin Newsom appointed a task force to study how to reverse decades of policies — and neglect — that black leaders say have fueled the flight.

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Nonprofit boards seeking diversity (Delaware Online)

Wednesday, August 22nd, 2007

Cynthia Primo Martin has been on so many nonprofit organization boards, she can’t name them all.

In fact, she and a small circle of blacks in the Wilmington area are asked over and over to join the ranks of nonprofit boards. But this tiny pool of lawyers, corporate executives and business people is shrinking — largely due to over-commitment.

Some nonprofit executives can immediately rattle off names of about 10 of their favorite black candidates, including Stacey J. Mobley, a senior vice president with the DuPont Co., and Joshua W. Martin III, Primo Martin’s husband, who is a former judge and president of Verizon Delaware, and currently a partner at a Wilmington law firm.

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Minorities at higher risk of arthritis disability (Science News)

Wednesday, August 15th, 2007

Black and Hispanic adults with arthritis are more likely than whites to become disabled from the joint disease, new research findings suggest.In a study that followed nearly 7,300 Americans with arthritis for six years, researchers found that African-American patients were twice as likely to develop a disability as their white counterparts. The same was true of Hispanic adults who spoke Spanish as their primary language, but not primarily English-speaking Hispanic patients.

A range of factors — from poorer overall health to lack of insurance to less-healthy lifestyles — together explained the racial disparity, the study found.

Full story…

How Minorities Move to New Neighborhoods (Huliq.com)

Wednesday, August 15th, 2007

A new study shows that minorities are making equal or even better economic gains than whites when moving to new neighborhoods, but adds that white children still populate the most advantaged neighborhoods in the nation.

On Aug. 12 at the 102nd annual meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA) in New York, Jeffrey Timberlake, UC assistant professor of sociology, presented his paper, “Scratchin’ and Surviving or Movin’ on Up? Two Sources of Change in Children’s Neighborhood Socioeconomic Status.”

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Countrywide accused of racial bias (Boston Globe)

Wednesday, August 15th, 2007

Three African-American mortgage borrowers from Boston accused Countrywide Home Loans Inc. of racial discrimination in a federal lawsuit yesterday, saying the nation’s largest home lender charged them more for subprime mortgages than it charged white borrowers in similar financial situations.
The lawsuit, filed in US Court in Boston, contended Countrywide violated federal housing discrimination laws because the black homeowners in Boston paid higher fees to the network of agents that generate Countrywide’s new customers. The company, the suit said, uses an ‘‘unchecked, subjective surcharge’’ that adds to the total costs of loans for its customers, and black borrowers, it contended, paid more than whites.

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Morgan Stanley Settles Class-Action Racial-Discrimination Lawsuit (DiversityInc)

Wednesday, August 15th, 2007

For the second time this year, Morgan Stanley has agreed to settle a class-action lawsuit, this time covering racial and ethnic discrimination of black and Latino employees in its retail brokerage division.

 

The lawsuit challenged inequities in opportunities for blacks and Latinos in the distribution of accounts and other professional development and was filed on behalf of approximately 1,200 black and Latino financial advisers and financial-adviser trainees employed at Morgan Stanley at any time since Oct. 12, 2002.

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Minorities Account for 51% of the U.S. Transplant Waiting List (PRNewswire)

Monday, August 6th, 2007

RICHMOND, Va., July 30 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — In observance ofNational Minority Donor Awareness Day, Donate Life America calls attention tothe 49,000 minority individuals that account for 51 percent of the UnitedStates transplant waiting list. There are nearly 100,000 people of all ages,races, and religions in desperate need of life-saving organ transplants thatmay not come in time. Hundreds of thousands more are in need of tissuetransplants to restore their health, mobility, and sight. To save these lives,the public is encouraged to visit http://www.donatelife.net and determine thesteps necessary to become registered donors in their state.

At the top of the list of minorities in need of organ transplants areAfrican Americans followed by Hispanics, Asians, Native Americans, PacificIslanders and people of Multiracial decent. African Americans alone accountfor 27 percent of people on the national waiting list and 35 percent of thosewaiting for kidneys.

Full story… 

African-American parents grapple with complex issues in Vick case (Kansas City Star)

Monday, August 6th, 2007

The ugliness that is the Michael Vick affair is hard to escape right now.A federal indictment against him on charges of dogfighting is disturbing in its detail, with allegations of electrocuting and shooting dogs.

When a sports celebrity takes such a public fall, parents may have to decide how to talk to their kids about the debacle. Kids who idolize the NFL star might seek answers to tough questions.

And for some African-American parents, the issue of race is as essential to a conversation about Vick as moral questions of right and wrong. At issue is not simply the indictment or the catalog of missteps the Atlanta Falcons star quarterback has accrued in the last six years.

It is the belief among some that, as a black man with a staggering paycheck, notoriety, unique talent and personality, Vick has always been something of a target.

Full story…

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