Archive for August, 2011

Minorities Now Majority in 8 Metro Areas

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

(Newser) In eight metropolitan areas including Washington, DC, New York, San Diego, Las Vegas, and Memphis, minorities now make up the majority of the population, according to census data. Over the past decade, non-Hispanic whites have become the minority in 22 of the 100 largest urban areas in the US, the Washington Post reports. In 42 of those 100 regions, the raw number of white people fell, but the percentage of whites fell in every single metro area. A big reason? The white population is aging, while the Hispanic and Asian populations fueling the growth are relatively young.

The shift happened shockingly fast, even to many officials. “What’s happened is pivotal,” says one demographer, noting that these regions will be the testing ground for how to “help minorities assimilate and become part of the labor force.” Another report notes the “literally mind-boggling” situation in Northern Virginia’s schools, where the student population grew by 119,000 over the past 15 years—white students accounted for just shy of 1,000 of those. The demographic shift is even starting to transform traditionally Republican areas to more Democratic ones, one expert notes.

Casino Town Puts Its Money on Hispanic Market

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011

(New York Times) For decades, a patch of casinos on the western edge of Nevada has relied on geography to lure California gamblers reluctant to drive the extra 45 miles for the glamour and glitz of Las Vegas.

But as the economy took a dive, this desert spot suffered the same economic woes as its larger, flashier neighbor. And the troubles were exacerbated by the proliferation of Indian casinos in California, which offered much of the same attractions as any town in Nevada. The company that ran the trio of casinos here declared bankruptcy in 2009.

Now Primm Valley Casino Resorts is betting that aggressively courting Latinos in Southern California will help lead to success.

They have blackjack games with bilingual dealers and rules printed in Spanish on the tables, the first casinos in the state to do so. Last year, they began a series of concerts featuring popular Spanish-speaking musicians, which fill the arena to capacity nearly every time. On those weekends, the casino floor of Buffalo Bill’s buzzes with an energy that executives say rivals New Year’s Eve.

Full story…

Hispanic Media Faring Better Than the Mainstream Media

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

(Infozine) Hispanic newspapers overall lost circulation in 2010, but not nearly to the extent of the English-language press. (English-language dailies saw a 5% decline for the six-month period from March to September 2010 compared with the same period the year before.) And daily Hispanic papers grew circulation by 1.9%. The financial picture seems to have improved as well in the last year.

Spanish-language television had an even more positive year. Univision's audience continued to grow and now competes with—-and in some timeslots outpaces—-audiences for ABC, CBS and NBC. Indeed, between Univision and Telemundo (and all of their stations), the 2010-2011 season is projected to bring in $1.5 billion in ad revenue.

Hispanic radio and magazines also showed growth. The number of Spanish-language radio stations grew 8% for the most recent year we have data (from 1,224 in 2008 to 1,323 in 2009), and magazine ad spending increased in 2010. There are several ways to measure ad spending and revenue, and looking across all of these calculations, PEJ puts Spanish-language magazine ad revenue growth at about 5% in 2010.

Full story…

African American Blood Pressure: Differences between Blacks and Whites

Tuesday, August 30th, 2011

(EmaxHealth) One of the more puzzling medical phenomena is the question of why African Americans have a significantly higher incidence of disease and death related to high blood pressure than everyone else in the world. Up till now, research has been devoted to a macroscopic view of diet, exercise, genetics and social factors. Today, however, researchers are publishing data that is the result of looking into the cause of high blood pressure in African Americans with a much more microscopic view at the cellular level. What they found was that there are significant differences between how cells in the blood vessels of African Americans respond to inflammation in comparison to the same type of cells in Caucasians.

Blood Pressure Facts and Numbers

High blood pressure is a major risk factor of heart disease and stroke, which are the first and third leading causes respectively of death in the United States. Approximately 1/3 of the U.S. population has high blood pressure. High blood pressure is typically defined as having a systolic reading of 140 mm Hg and higher or a diastolic reading of 90 mm Hg and higher. One-quarter of the population is pre-hypertensive, meaning that while their blood pressure numbers do not qualify as high enough to meet the criteria of high blood pressure, they are still higher than normal and need to be monitored. People who are pre-hypertensive are usually labeled as “borderline” by their physicians.

Full story…

In the Gap: African American doctors

Monday, August 29th, 2011

(Newsworks) About six percent of the nation's physicians are African American; while about 13 percent of the population is black. Many experts say that gap hinders health care.

So, does race really matter in medicine? Talk to Thomas Jefferson University oncologist Edith Mitchell and she shares a story from her days as a young fellow.

The patient had breast cancer, and Mitchell recommended an X-ray, then reached for her pad to order the test. The patient said she already had a prescription.

"It turns out she had been in that clinic every July for four consecutive years, and each time she took the slip and put it into her pocketbook and she still had it," she said.

The woman's church considered X-rays harmful to the body. So Mitchell worked with that belief and found an alternative treatment that slowed the woman's cancer. Mitchell is convinced the patient finally felt heard because she's an African American and the patient was too.

Full story…

Is Hollywood Ready for a South Asian American Child Star?

Monday, August 29th, 2011

(Divanee) It’s fair to say that Aziz Ansari, Mindy Kaling and Kal Penn have become household names, paving the way for many South Asian performers — including the cast of the recently-canceled “Outsourced” and younger stars such as Manish Dayal (“90210″) and Dilshad Vadsaria (“Greek”). There was once a time when South Asian actors did little more than play a glorified extra, and more often than not the focal point of their walk-on roles was to score laughs with a funny-sounding Indian accent. Though those days seem long gone, a recent promo for an upcoming Disney Channel show caught my eye and left me pondering a larger issue: Where are the South Asian American child stars?

The show in question is “Jessie” and debuts on Sept. 30, starring Debby Ryan of “The Suite Life on Deck” fame. But my eyes went straight to the little Indian boy featured in the teaser – a young actor by the name of Karan Brar, who also appeared in the feature film “Diary of a Wimpy Kid”. The reason he caught my eye is because his one line showcased him speaking in a faint Indian accent. My Wikipedia search led me to the revelation that Brar will play 10-year-old Ravi Ross, an “Indian adoptee imbued with his Eastern culture, but thrilled with his new life in America“.

Full story…

Regina Benjamin Claims Hair Care Keeps Black Women From Exercising

Sunday, August 28th, 2011

(ThirdAge.com) Regina Benjamin, surgeon general, has announced that she believes many black women do not exercise because they don’t want to mess up their hair.

In attempt to make a point about why African American women have higher rates of obesity than other demographic groups, Benjamin made her announcement at the Bronner Brothers International Hair Show earlier in the month.

"Often times you get women saying, ‘I can't exercise today because I don't want to sweat my hair back or get my hair wet.' When you're starting to exercise, you look for reasons not to, and sometimes the hair is one of those reasons," said Benjamin, as quoted by Jezebel.

The main issue, according to Benjamin, is that many women spend a lot of money on hair products to straighten their unruly hair. Exercising involves fast movement and sweat, both of which can easily undo chemical hair treatments.

Full story…

How Conservative Myths Stoke Racial Fear

Sunday, August 28th, 2011

(The Root) Many Americans are struck by how politics has taken such a sharp turn toward the openly racist since the election of the nation's first black president. Some Republicans have distributed cartoons depicting watermelon patches growing at the White House, and the president smiling with fried chicken and barbecue. One prominent South Carolina GOP activist even called the first lady a gorilla.

But I am also struck by how much the right has relied on outright fabrication of the country's history by insisting that institutionalized racism hardly ever existed. The right generally insists that white racism has no real effect on people's lives in the U.S., while exploiting racial fears and pernicious racial stereotypes with coded and not-so-coded language. The only "discrimination" is that directed against whites, pundits often argue. In fact, white Americans in general believe that whites suffer more discrimination today than African Americans do, according to a study released this May.

Full story…

Diversity: Don’t Innovate Without It

Saturday, August 27th, 2011

(BusinessWeek) A white guy, a white guy, and a white guy walk into a bar…did we lose you yet?

Thought so. Nothing interesting was going to come from that joke. Humor works when you have an unexpected, compelling outcome. So does the innovation process. In fact, that's the goal, and it's often achieved by adding diversity—getting the ideas of people of different ages, genders, races, and ethnic backgrounds; people with varying perspectives, personalities, experiences, mindsets, etc.

But when most think about the topic of diversity, it is invariably in terms of "inclusion," "multicultural acceptance," and "global integration." All of those have tremendous merit, but why the heck, when you hear the word "diversity," are you suddenly thinking like someone who has Equal Employment Opportunity responsibilities? Yes, your company does, but you are responsible for hardcore growth results: marketing, and new product development.

Full story…

Hispanic college enrollment spikes, study shows

Saturday, August 27th, 2011

(Orlando Sentinel) Cristina González saw the economy taking a turn for the worse while she was working at a clothing store during high school. Customers weren't spending as much, her hours were cut back and some people she knew were laid off. A life working at the mall was not enticing.

"I knew college was my best chance," said González, 21, now a senior majoring in communications at the University of Central Florida. She hopes to become the first in her family get a college degree.

González is one of thousands of Hispanic students across the nation who enrolled in college for similar reasons. A Pew Hispanic Center study released Thursday found that the number of young Hispanics attending two- and four-year colleges has reached an all-time high of 1.8 million, with Latino enrollment increasing 24 percent between 2009 and 2010. The economy, the study found, has been a big motivator.

Full story…

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