Archive for December, 2011

Lure of Chinese Tuition Squeezes Out Asian-Americans

Saturday, December 31st, 2011

(Beritabiz) Kwanhyun Park, the 18-year-old son of Korean immigrants, spent four years at Beverly Hills High School earning the straight As and high test scores he thought would get him into the University of California, San Diego. They weren’t enough.

The sought-after school, half a mile from the Pacific Ocean, admitted 1,460 fewer California residents this year to accept higher-paying students from out-of-state, many from China.

“I was shocked,” said Park, who also was rejected from four other UC schools, including the top-ranked campuses in Berkeley and Los Angeles, even with a 4.0 grade-point average and an SAT score above the UC San Diego average. “I took it terribly. I felt like I was doing well and I failed.”

The University of California system, rocked by budget cuts, is enrolling record numbers of out-of-state and international students, who pay almost twice that of in-state residents. Among those being squeezed out: high-achieving Asian-Americans, many of them children of immigrants, who for decades flocked to the state’s elite public colleges to move up the economic ladder.

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Study shows racial disparity in treatment for depression

Friday, December 30th, 2011

(Boston Herald) African-American senior citizens are significantly less likely than whites to be diagnosed and treated for depression, a Rutgers University study concluded.

Researchers reviewed five years of national data from the U.S. Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey, looking at the financial, insurance and health-care use information of 33,708 beneficiaries from 2001 to 2005.

The Rutgers study, to appear in the February edition of the American Journal of Public Health, found that depression diagnosis rates were 6.4 percent for non-Hispanic whites and 4.2 percent for African-Americans.

Researchers believe that many African-Americans are depressed but aren’t getting the diagnosis or help they need, said Ayse Akincigil, lead researcher and an assistant professor at Rutgers School of Social Work.

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Hispanic leaders demand Arpaio quit

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

(UPI) Hispanic leaders in Phoenix say Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio should resign following a court ruling that his officers engage in racial profiling.

U.S. District Judge Murray Snow also said in his decision Friday that being in the United States illegally is not grounds for arrest.

Antonio Bustamente of Los Abogados, the Arizona Hispanic Bar Association, called Snow's ruling "monumentally important," The Arizona Republic reported. Bustamente appeared with other leaders at a news conference Monday at the El Portal restaurant in Phoenix.

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Sen. Gillibrand Calls for Investigation of U.S. Military Hazing and Bullying

Wednesday, December 28th, 2011

(ABC News) A senator is calling on the Defense Department to conduct a system-wide review of alleged hazing incidents in the military, after eight soldiers in Afghanistan were charged in connection with the death of Army Pvt. Danny Chen, who apparently committed suicide in October.

Chen had told family and friends that he was the target of persistent racial taunts and abusive treatment by his comrades in arms.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, requested the investigation due to concern that Chen's death is a reflection of a larger problem of military hazing.

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For Black Americans, A Longer Time Without Work

Tuesday, December 27th, 2011

(NPR) Although the U.S. gained more than 120,000 jobs last month, the numbers of long-term unemployed barely shifted, and unemployment rates for African-Americans continued to go through the roof.

 Willa Booker, 53, has been out of work for more than two years. A former medical records administrator in Chicago, Booker says she just wants someone to give her a chance.

A recent NPR and Kaiser Family Foundation poll shows that although the long-term unemployed face many of the same difficulties regardless of race, there are distinct differences between blacks and whites struggling to find work.

Out-of-work blacks, whites, Latinos and Asians all took part in the NPR-Kaiser survey. Only blacks and whites had a large enough sample, however, for the surveyors to specifically break out their responses.

"First of all, we found that among those people who have been unemployed for a long time, African-Americans make up a greater share of that population than they do of full-time workers," says Kaiser Family Foundation researcher Liz Hamel.

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Study finds colorectal cancer mortality dropping slower in African Americans

Monday, December 26th, 2011

(MedicalXpress.com) A new study finds that while colorectal cancer mortality rates dropped in the most recent two decades for every stage in both African Americans and whites, the decreases were smaller for African Americans, particularly for distant stage disease. The authors say concerted efforts to prevent or detect colorectal cancer at earlier stages in blacks could improve worsening black-white disparities.

Before 1980, colorectal for African Americans were lower than those for whites. Since then, however, the pattern of CRC mortality rates has reversed and diverged, so that in 2007, the rate for African Americans was 44 percent higher than for whites. This worsening disparity in mortality rates coincided with the introduction and of screening and improved treatment for colorectal cancer.

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Hispanic American Bishops Write Letter to ‘Undocumented Immigrants’

Sunday, December 25th, 2011

(National Catholic Register) The Catholic Church in the United States stands with undocumented immigrants, declares a letter written by 33 of the nation’s Hispanic bishops.

The letter, released on Dec. 12, the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, says the Church sees the suffering face of Jesus in the tribulations of immigrants.

Addressing themselves to those “who lack proper authorization to live and work in our country,” the bishops declare their solidarity with immigrants, promising them that they are not alone or forgotten.

“Many of you perform the most difficult jobs and receive miserable salaries and no health insurance or Social Security. Despite your contributions to the well-being of our country, instead of receiving our thanks, you are often treated as criminals because you have violated current immigration laws,” the bishops said.

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8 soldiers charged in private’s death; racial harassment may be a factor

Saturday, December 24th, 2011

(Kansas City Star) The Army filed charges Wednesday against eight Alaska-based soldiers in the death of a 19-year-old Army private, in a sign that the military is investigating whether racial harassment could have led him to commit suicide.

Pvt. Danny Chen's body was found in a guard tower in Afghanistan's Kandahar province in October, two months into his deployment. The New York native died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, but Chen's family and the Chinese-American community pressed the military to explain what led Chen to kill himself. The New York Times later reported that investigators had told Chen's family that superiors had abused him and taunted him with ethnic slurs.

"There was some serious misconduct in this situation," said Jacinta Ma, the deputy director of the Asian American Justice Center, who was part of a group of Asian-American organizations that met with Pentagon officials this month on behalf of Chen's family to discuss their concerns that Chen's case is not an isolated incident.

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Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2011/12/21/3332099/8-soldiers-charged-in-privates.html#storylin

 

The Army filed charges Wednesday against eight Alaska-based soldiers in the death of a 19-year-old Army private, in a sign that the military is investigating whether racial harassment could have led him to commit suicide. Pvt. Danny Chen's body was found in a guard tower in Afghanistan's Kandahar province in October, two months into his deployment. The New York native died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound, but Chen's family and the Chinese-American community pressed the military to explain what led Chen to kill himself. The New York Times later reported that investigators had told Chen's family that superiors had abused him and taunted him with ethnic slurs. "There was some serious misconduct in this situation," said Jacinta Ma, the deputy director of the Asian American Justice Center, who was part of a group of Asian-American organizations that met with Pentagon officials this month on behalf of Chen's family to discuss their concerns that Chen's case is not an isolated incident.

Read more here: http://www.kansascity.com/2011/12/21/3332099/8-soldiers-charged-in-privates.html#storylink=cpy

BofA settles loans-bias case: $335M

Friday, December 23rd, 2011

(Miami Herald) In the largest residential fair-lending settlement in history, the Bank of America Corp. has agreed to pay $335 million to settle allegations that its Countrywide Financial Corp. unit discriminated against minority homebuyers, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

The agreement resolves a civil complaint that the mortgage lender charged black and Hispanic borrowers higher fees and steered them into costlier mortgages than other buyers from 2004 to 2008, a period when the company originated millions of home loans.

It also marks Charlotte, N.C.-based Bank of America’s latest step to move past the mortgage-related troubles that have pummeled its bottom line and stock price since acquiring Countrywide in 2008.

Full story…

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/12/21/2557511/bofa-settles-loans-bias-case-335m.html#storylink=cpy
In the largest residential fair-lending settlement in history, the Bank of America Corp. has agreed to pay $335 million to settle allegations that its Countrywide Financial Corp. unit discriminated against minority homebuyers, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.The agreement resolves a civil complaint that the mortgage lender charged black and Hispanic borrowers higher fees and steered them into costlier mortgages than other buyers from 2004 to 2008, a period when the company originated millions of home loans.It also marks Charlotte, N.C.-based Bank of America’s latest step to move past the mortgage-related troubles that have pummeled its bottom line and stock price since acquiring Countrywide in 2008.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/12/21/2557511/bofa-settles-loans-bias-case-335m.html#storylink=cpy

In the largest residential fair-lending settlement in history, the Bank of America Corp. has agreed to pay $335 million to settle allegations that its Countrywide Financial Corp. unit discriminated against minority homebuyers, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Wednesday.The agreement resolves a civil complaint that the mortgage lender charged black and Hispanic borrowers higher fees and steered them into costlier mortgages than other buyers from 2004 to 2008, a period when the company originated millions of home loans.It also marks Charlotte, N.C.-based Bank of America’s latest step to move past the mortgage-related troubles that have pummeled its bottom line and stock price since acquiring Countrywide in 2008.

Read more here: http://www.miamiherald.com/2011/12/21/2557511/bofa-settles-loans-bias-case-335m.html#storylink=cpy

Hispanic Society Enlists Sotheby’s to Auction Rare Collection of Coins

Thursday, December 22nd, 2011

(New York Times) A rare collection of almost 38,000 coins is expected to raise between $25 million and $35 million for the Hispanic Society of America, Sotheby’s New York announced Thursday. The collection, assembled more than 100 years ago by Archer M. Huntington, the founder of the Hispanic Society, will be offered as a single lot in sealed bid auction beginning Thursday and ending next March.

Considered one of the most important collections outside of Spain related to Spanish history, it includes the “50 Excelentes,” a gold coin weighing nearly five ounces created in the 15th century, during the period of Christopher Columbus’s voyages to the New World. The coin, according to a statement from Sotheby’s, “is the largest gold coin from the 15th century that survives today.” In addition, there are more than 400 Roman gold coins that span the full history of Rome, including examples struck under Julius Caesar.

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