Archive for July, 2013

Gallup: Approval Of Black/White Intermarriage At An All-Time High

Wednesday, July 31st, 2013

(Mediaite) And in other news, we’re still asking about black-white intermarriage. In one of several recent Gallup polls on racial issues, approval of black people marrying white people has ticked up a whole percentage point since 2011, to 87%, and is even at 84% among white people. However, 75% of white people still don’t understand that the American justice system is biased against black people, and while a majority of white people and black people support affirmative action, the also don’t. Finally, black and Hispanic people don’t really care if you call them black or African American, and Hispanic or Latino. That will be a relief to all the people in 1991 who are still wondering about that.

The intermarriage and criminal justice questions suffer from the same assumption that other recent polls have, which is that the demarcation line on these questions must necessarily be race. Gallup didn’t even bother to crosstab these questions by party or ideology, which severely hampers their usefulness.

Full story…

Monday, July 29th, 2013

(USAToday) Escalating the politically charged debate over voting rights in America, the Justice Department went to court Thursday in an attempt to require the state of Texas to get approval from the federal government before making changes to the state's voting process.

Attorney General Eric Holder told delegates to the National Urban League's conference in Philadelphia that the move was in direct response to last month's Supreme Court decision that struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. That provision allowed the Justice Department to take action against jurisdictions that adopted discriminatory voting laws. It has applied to Texas and eight other states, as well as to parts of six others.

"This is the department's first action to protect voting rights (since last month's Supreme Court decision), but it won't be our last,'' Holder said. "We cannot allow the slow unraveling of the progress that so many, throughout history, have sacrificed so much to achieve.''

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Gulf Grows in Black-White Views of U.S. Justice System Bias

Friday, July 26th, 2013

(Gallup.com) While 68% of blacks say the American justice system is biased against blacks, 25% of whites agree. Blacks' attitudes about the justice system have remained virtually constant over the past 20 years, but whites have become less likely to perceive bias.

The new results are based on interviews with 2,541 Americans, including 1,841 non-Hispanic whites and 230 non-Hispanic blacks, conducted as part of Gallup Daily tracking July 16-21, after the verdict in the George Zimmerman trial was handed down. Zimmerman was found not guilty of second-degree murder and manslaughter charges in the shooting death of a young black man, Trayvon Martin.

 

The Gallup data reveal a continuing divide by race in views of the fairness of the American justice system. This current divergence by race in views of bias in the justice system is broadly similar to attitudes measured in Gallup surveys conducted in 1993 and in 2008, although the percentage of white Americans who say the justice system is biased has dropped by eight percentage points over that time, while the percentage of blacks has stayed constant.

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Asiana jokes: Racist or just bad taste?

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

(CNN) – The names, which some liken to slurs, spread everywhere — triggering anger in the United States as well as South Korea.

Last week, KTVU, a TV station based in the San Francisco area, aired what it believed were the names of the Asiana Airlines Flight 214 pilots. A National Transportation Safety Board intern confirmed the bogus names — phrases which sounded like "Something Wrong" and "We Too Low."

And hello, perfect storm. Or as one blogger put it — "an epic mind-blowing fail."

The crash of the South Korean carrier had already hit racial notes — with jokes mocking Asian driving or piloting skills and questions whether the crash had to do with the Korean culture.

U.S. comedian Bill Maher quipped on his show, "Now that we know the cause of that Asiana Airlines crash was the pilots flying too slowly, I don't want to hear another word about me doing Asian driver jokes." His comment followed an array of similar jokes on social media.

Full story…

‘Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago’, Obama says

Sunday, July 21st, 2013

(Guardian)Barack Obama used an unexpected speech at the White House to personally address the debates over race relations that have convulsed America since George Zimmerman was acquitted over the shooting of the unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.

In remarks immediately interpreted as the most expansive comments on race since he became president, Obama said the US was still not "a post-racial society".

"You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is: Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago," he said.

"And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there's a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it's important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn't go away."

The president's intervention surprised Washington. For almost a week, Obama has resisted getting involved the swirling debates over racial discrimination, and was coming under growing criticism for his failure to respond to strong public outrage.

Full story…

Barack Obama used an unexpected speech at the White House to personally address the debates over race relations that have convulsed America since George Zimmerman was acquitted over the shooting of the unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.

In remarks immediately interpreted as the most expansive comments on race since he became president, Obama said the US was still not "a post-racial society".

"You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is: Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago," he said.

"And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there's a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it's important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn't go away."

The president's intervention surprised Washington. For almost a week, Obama has resisted getting involved the swirling debates over racial discrimination, and was coming under growing criticism for his failure to respond to strong public outrage.

Barack Obama used an unexpected speech at the White House to personally address the debates over race relations that have convulsed America since George Zimmerman was acquitted over the shooting of the unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.

In remarks immediately interpreted as the most expansive comments on race since he became president, Obama said the US was still not "a post-racial society".

"You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is: Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago," he said.

"And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there's a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it's important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn't go away."

The president's intervention surprised Washington. For almost a week, Obama has resisted getting involved the swirling debates over racial discrimination, and was coming under growing criticism for his failure to respond to strong public outrage.

Barack Obama used an unexpected speech at the White House to personally address the debates over race relations that have convulsed America since George Zimmerman was acquitted over the shooting of the unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.

In remarks immediately interpreted as the most expansive comments on race since he became president, Obama said the US was still not "a post-racial society".

"You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is: Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago," he said.

"And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there's a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it's important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn't go away."

The president's intervention surprised Washington. For almost a week, Obama has resisted getting involved the swirling debates over racial discrimination, and was coming under growing criticism for his failure to respond to strong public outrage.

Barack Obama used an unexpected speech at the White House to personally address the debates over race relations that have convulsed America since George Zimmerman was acquitted over the shooting of the unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.

In remarks immediately interpreted as the most expansive comments on race since he became president, Obama said the US was still not "a post-racial society".

"You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is: Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago," he said.

"And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there's a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it's important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn't go away."

The president's intervention surprised Washington. For almost a week, Obama has resisted getting involved the swirling debates over racial discrimination, and was coming under growing criticism for his failure to respond to strong public outrage.

Barack Obama used an unexpected speech at the White House to personally address the debates over race relations that have convulsed America since George Zimmerman was acquitted over the shooting of the unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin.

In remarks immediately interpreted as the most expansive comments on race since he became president, Obama said the US was still not "a post-racial society".

"You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is: Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago," he said.

"And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there's a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it's important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn't go away."

The president's intervention surprised Washington. For almost a week, Obama has resisted getting involved the swirling debates over racial discrimination, and was coming under growing criticism for his failure to respond to strong public outrage.

Asiana Airlines to sue KTVU over fake pilot names

Friday, July 19th, 2013

(NBC News) Asiana Airlines will sue the San Francisco TV station for their false report of the phony names of the pilots flying the airplane that crashed at San Francisco International Airport on July 6, killing three and injuring dozens.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Asiana Airlines said Monday that it will sue Bay-area television station KTVU-TV for reporting fake and racially offensive names for the four pilots manning Flight 214 that crashed at San Francisco International airport earlier this month.

“This legal action is being taken because of the KTVU report that not only disparaged Asians in general through the use of racially charged epithets, but also severely damaged the reputation of Asiana Airlines,” the company said in a statement.

The airline has decided to sue the station to ”strongly respond to its racially discriminatory report,” spokeswoman Lee Hyomin said. The airline said it had selected a U.S. law firm and will likely file suit in U.S. courts, she added.

During a noon newscast on Friday, a KTVU anchor read four names including “Capt. Sum Ting Wong” and “Wi Tu Lo” on the air and quickly apologized for the false report after the commercial break. The station issued a statement saying that an NTSB official in Washington had confirmed the names earlier Friday morning.

Full story…

Despite outrage, federal charges uncertain in Zimmerman case

Wednesday, July 17th, 2013

(CNN) – In the emotional aftermath of the Trayvon Martin killing last year, Attorney General Eric Holder signaled the unlikelihood of filing federal hate crimes charges against admitted shooter George Zimmerman.

"For a federal hate crime, we have to prove the highest standard in the law," Holder said in April 2012, 45 days after Zimmerman shot the African American teenager in what was depicted by civil rights groups as a racially motivated killing.

In words that now sound prescient, Holder described to reporters that day how "something that was reckless, that was negligent does not meet that standard."

"We have to show that there was specific intent to do the crime with requisite state of mind," he said.

Zimmerman's acquittal of state murder and manslaughter charges on Saturday showed the Florida jury rejected that he intended to kill Martin for any reason, including the racial motivation necessary for federal charges that he violated Martin's civil rights.

Full story…

How do Americans decide who is a racist?

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

(Herald Online) I am so old that I can remember when most of the people promoting race hate were white.

Apparently other Americans also recognize that the sources of racism are different today from what they were in the past. According to a recent Rasmussen poll, 31 percent of blacks think that most blacks are racists, while 24 percent of blacks think that most whites are racist.

The difference between these percentages is not great, but it is remarkable nevertheless. After all, generations of blacks fought the white racism from which they suffered for so long. If many blacks themselves now think that most other blacks are racist, that is startling.

The moral claims advanced by generations of black leaders – claims that eventually touched the conscience of the nation and turned the tide toward civil rights for all – have now been cheapened by today's generation of black “leaders,” who act as if it is all just a matter of whose ox is gored.

Even in legal cases involving terrible crimes – the O.J. Simpson murder trial or the charges of gang rape against Duke University students – many black “leaders” and their followers have not waited for facts about who was guilty and who was not, but have immediately taken sides, based on who was black and who was white.

Full story…

Diversity in newsrooms stagnates

Sunday, July 14th, 2013

(Politico) The Atlantic's Riva Gold looks at recent data from the American Society of News Editors showing stagnation in the rise of minorities in America's newsrooms:  

At a time when non-whites make up roughly 37 percent of the U.S. population, the percentage of minorities in the newsroom has fallen to 12.37 percent from its 13.73 percent high in 2006. In last year's 2012 ASNE study, overall newsroom employment was down 2.4 percent, but the picture looked much worse – down 5.7 percent – for minorities.

This means that fewer minorities are getting the opportunity to work in news, and news organizations are losing their ability to empower , represent, –and especially in cases where language ability is crucial, even to report on minority populations in their communities."

Full story…

Asiana Airlines Headline Called “Racist” and “In Bad Taste”

Friday, July 12th, 2013

(Kotaku) This weekend, tragedy struck. Asiana Airlines Flight 214 crashed in San Francisco. Over 180 people are injured, and two are dead. Nineteen passengers are still hospitalized, with six still incritical condition. Two thirds of the passengers were Asian, which is why the Chicago Sun-Times's headline is angering some online.

As pointed out by AsAmNews, the Sunday headline read, "Fright 214".

There is, of course, a long tradition of mocking Asians—especially Chinese as well as Japanese—by not differentiating between "L" and "R" sounds in English. Case in point: the "fried rice" scene in Lethal Weapon 4.

For many, the headline appeared to perpetuate the stereotypical Asian accent.

"First, its pretty sick to use a play on words in a headline for a tragedy," wrote AsAmNews. "Secondly, this one’s pretty racist."

Some commenters on AsAmNews agreed that it was racist, with one even calling it a "sick joke". Others seemed to think it was simply in poor taste and unintentionally showed bad judgment while covering the crash. It felt oddly reminiscent of ESPN's "Chink in the Armor"headline.

Full story…

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