#AfricanAmerican genetic mutations pose Rx challenge. 37% more likely to develop lung cancer.

(Cancer Network) Lung cancer is not a discriminate disease, but the disease burden is especially high on African Americans in the U.S. The statistics are stark: African-American men are 37% more likely to develop lung cancer than white men and are 22% more likely to die of it. In addition, only 12% of African Americans live longer than five years after a diagnosis of lung cancer, compared with 16% of whites, according to a recent report by the American Lung Association (see Fact box).

One suggested reason for this gap in outcomes is differences in race-based genetics. In the era of personalized medicine and treatments that target specific disease pathways, identifying genetic differences among populations is becoming increasingly important to optimize benefit.

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One Response to “#AfricanAmerican genetic mutations pose Rx challenge. 37% more likely to develop lung cancer.”

  1. I lost my beloved husband to lung cancer 9 years ago. By the time he was diagnosed, he was Stage !V and it had spread to his spine and brain. He continued to live his life as before, practicing his music and even joined me as we spent two years learning Hebrew before our B’Nai Mitzvahs in February 5, 2000. He died three weeks later, on February 26th.

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