Posts Tagged ‘enrollment’

As Hispanic college enrollment steadily climbs, local colleges prepare

Saturday, September 15th, 2012

 

(Las Vegas Sun) Over the past four decades, the Hispanic portion of U.S. college enrollment has steadily increased, and for the first time ever, Hispanics are the largest minority group on college campuses, a new report indicates.

In Southern Nevada, institutions are executing plans to boost Hispanic enrollment and increase support services for minority students. Not only are the initiatives important to address the shifting demographics of Nevada’s schools, but they also could lead to one or more of the local colleges receiving federal Hispanic Serving Institution status, which can open doors to more funding.

According to a Pew Research Center report released in August, the number of 18- to 24-year-old Hispanics enrolled in college in the United States exceeded 2 million and reached a record 16.5 percent of all U.S. college enrollments in 2011. In 1972, the Hispanic share of U.S. college enrollments was 2.9 percent.

Full story…

Should Asians Be Excluded From Affirmative Action Programs/Diversity Scholarships In The United States?

Tuesday, September 4th, 2012

 

(Forbes) No.

The argument for race-conscious affirmative action is that, all other factors being equal, people of color still experience obstacles to pursuing an education based on subtle discrimination in policy or daily practice. This certainly applies to Asian Americans.Sure, the benefit given to an affluent Asian student should not be as great as that given to a lower-income Asian student, but I’m open to the possibility that this affluent Asian student still experiences more educational obstacles than similarly affluent white students.

The basis of an affirmative action policy that evaluates race must consider the unique challenges experienced by Asian students. Consider the Asian American student population, which is widely diverse. Many students’ parents are immigrants. Some are immigrants themselves. While some students’ parents immigrated as college or graduate students themselves, others immigrated as refugees or migrant workers. Asian American households experience longer periods of continuous unemployment than any other group.[1] Many Asian American parents do not have English fluency, which limits civic participation. Asian Americans experience employment discrimination in a variety of sectors after graduation, as do their parents.[2] The proportion of legacy applicants among Asian students is much lower than that among white students, due to historically restrictive immigration.

Full story…

Latinos Top Minority College Enrollment, Pew Hispanic Center Finds

Saturday, August 25th, 2012

 

(National Journal) In 2011, Latinos for the first time became the largest minority group in four-year colleges and universities across the United States, according to a Pew Hispanic Center report.

The number of 18- to-24-year-old Latinos enrolled in college surpassed 2 million in 2011, accounting for 16.5 percent of the student population. The increase may be associated as much with population growth as with modest gains in high school graduation rates, according to the report released on Monday by the nonpartisan research center.

High school graduation rates reached an all-time high for Latinos in 2011, the Pew study found. The number of Latinos earning a high school diploma or General Education Development certificate increased to 76 percent in 2011, up from 73 percent in 2010, researchers said. Nearly 47 percent of those graduates were enrolled in a two-year community college or four-year undergraduate program.

Full story…

Hispanic college enrollment spikes, study shows

Saturday, August 27th, 2011

(Orlando Sentinel) Cristina González saw the economy taking a turn for the worse while she was working at a clothing store during high school. Customers weren't spending as much, her hours were cut back and some people she knew were laid off. A life working at the mall was not enticing.

"I knew college was my best chance," said González, 21, now a senior majoring in communications at the University of Central Florida. She hopes to become the first in her family get a college degree.

González is one of thousands of Hispanic students across the nation who enrolled in college for similar reasons. A Pew Hispanic Center study released Thursday found that the number of young Hispanics attending two- and four-year colleges has reached an all-time high of 1.8 million, with Latino enrollment increasing 24 percent between 2009 and 2010. The economy, the study found, has been a big motivator.

Full story…

Subscribe to RSS feed