Posts Tagged ‘UCSF’

Latino Kids Being Targeted In Soda Wars For Obesity Studies

Thursday, April 4th, 2013

 

(Huffington Post) Are Latino kids being unfairly targeted as study subjects for obesity in youth and the relationship to drinking a lot of sodas?

There is now a growing controversy over the cottage industry of grant money going to study soda-drinking Hispanic kids, with the center of the storm a $30,000 payout from National Institute of Health to a researcher at the University of California, San Francisco.

It sounds like academic overkill to some, particularly the soda beverage lobby, especially the speculation that the final cost of that study might be something like $100,000.

But the fact of the matter is that, these grants aside, obesity among Latino kids – and their soda drinking habits – is a serious national health problem, at least to Hispanic health which already is hard hit by increasing diabetes rates.

Full story…

Report Identifies Ways to Increase #Diversity in US Medical Schools

Sunday, May 30th, 2010

(WebMD) A recent report of a study by the University of California–San Francisco (UCSF) has identified key areas that have been effective in increasing diversity in US medical schools.

The study specifically focuses on 2 California universities — Stanford University and UCSF — as examples of institutions that have effectively increased the number of underrepresented groups in their medical schools.

Both institutions were early adopters of effective methods to enroll, sustain, and graduate medical students from underrepresented ethnic and racial groups in the United States, including blacks, Latinos, American Indians, Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders.

“These institutions offer a roadmap for continued increases in diversity of medical school populations,” said coauthor Patricia E. Franks, senior research associate at the UCSF Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies, in a UCSF news release.

The study, titled “Diversity in US Medical Schools: Revitalizing Efforts to Increase Diversity in a Changing Context, 1960s-2000s,” was released in March.

Full story…

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