Posts Tagged ‘university’

Latinos head to college at a record rate, now on par with white students

Friday, May 24th, 2013

(Christian Science Monitor) Latino high school graduates are enrolling in college at an all-time high and, for the first time, at a rate comparable to that of their white peers.

A record 69 percent of Latino students enrolled in college after their 2012 high school graduation, according to a new report by the Pew Hispanic Center. Overall, 66 percent of all 2012 high school graduates immediately enrolled in college, but Latinos did so at higher rates than whites (67 percent) and blacks (63 percent), according to preliminary data.

Latinos are the fastest-growing minority population in the US, but the increased rate of Latino students enrolling in college is more than just a demographic trend, says Pew senior research associate Richard Fry. It’s a sign that the education gap is narrowing,

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Is the Ivy League Fair to Asian Americans?

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

(The Atlantic) Are Ivy League institutions discriminating against Asian Americans by limiting how many are admitted? That's the subject of a debate published this week in the New York Times. Let's start with the folks who believe that there's effectively a race-based quota limiting Asian Americans.

Ron Unz makes the most powerful argument for that proposition. "After the Justice Department closed an investigation in the early 1990s into charges that Harvard University discriminated against Asian-American applicants, Harvard's reported enrollment of Asian-Americans began gradually declining, falling from 20.6 percent in 1993 to about 16.5 percent over most of the last decade," he writes. "This decline might seem small. But these same years brought a huge increase in America's college-age Asian population, which roughly doubled between 1992 and 2011, while non-Hispanic white numbers remained almost unchanged. Thus, according to official statistics, the percentage of Asian-Americans enrolled at Harvard fell by more than 50 percent over the last two decades, while the percentage of whites changed little. This decline in relative Asian-American enrollment was actually larger than the impact of Harvard's 1925 Jewish quota, which reduced Jewish freshmen from 27.6 percent to 15 percent."

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Colleges’ Plan B for Diversity

Saturday, October 13th, 2012

 

(National Journal) Many colleges and universities appear to be preparing for alternative methods of increasing racial diversity on their campuses by adopting admissions policies that place more emphasis on class and income.

survey by Inside Higher Ed, which asked admissions directors about likely steps they would take if the Supreme Court prohibits them from using affirmative action in colleges and universities, showed that many favor changes to admissions policy that are race-neutral.

(RELATED: As High Court Prepares to Hear Affirmative-Action Case, Issues of Race Equality Remain.)

About 30 percent administrators said they would consider placing greater weight on first-generation status, while 20 percent said they would focus on applicants’ socioeconomic status. Another 10 percent of directors at public, four-year institutions said they favored dropping standardized test scores.

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Why the high court should back race-based college admissions

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

(Washington Post) THE SUPREME COURT will consider Wednesday its biggest affirmative action case in a decade when the justices examine the suit of Abigail Fisher, a woman denied admission to the University of Texas (UT) at Austin in 2008. Lawyers for Ms. Fisher, who is white, claim that she suffered unjustly by having to compete against African American and Hispanic applicants in a system that considers race. Ms. Fisher wants the court to deem the university’s inclusion of race in its admissions process unlawful, a request the justices should deny. The worry is that the court will use Ms. Fisher’s case to rewrite decades of precedent, with implications for nearly every campus in the country, public and private.

Nobody should be comfortable with any system that uses race as a criterion to distribute scarce opportunities, such as admission to Texas’s flagship public university. Yet, as Justice Lewis Powell wrote in 1978, the country’s future depends on exposing prospective leaders “to ideas and mores of students as diverse as this nation of many peoples.” So does the legitimacy of institutions such as UT.

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New data on affirmative action in college

Sunday, October 7th, 2012

 

(SFgate) As the Supreme Court revisits the use of race in college admissions next week, critics of affirmative action are hopeful the justices will roll back the practice – and a new report Wednesday offers a big reason for their optimism.

Evidence from at least some of the nine states that don't use affirmative action shows that leading public universities can bring meaningful diversity to their campuses through race-neutral means.

That conclusion is vigorously disputed by supporters of race-based affirmative action, including universities in states like California that cannot under state law factor race into admissions decisions.

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Harvard University Students Feel Latino Community Is ‘Neglected’ On Campus

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

(Harvard Crimson) Harvard was missing something. Surrounded by peers at the annual Latino Ivy League Conference in Ithaca last November, Daniel J. Artiga ’15 came to this realization: As students active in the Latino community described the resources provided on their respective campuses, he had little to add. “Yale spoke, Brown spoke, they all had something great to say,” he remembers. But then it was Harvard’s turn. “The other delegates and I mentioned how it would be awkward beforehand, because we didn’t have a lot to say,” recalled Artiga, vice president of the Latino Men’s Collective. “But it didn’t hit me until I was actually sitting in a room listening to other students bragging about how well their Latino community is treated—and how ours is, I feel, neglected.”

Harvard prides itself on being at the vanguard of new inquiry. Yet when it comes to the study and support of the nation’s—and higher education’s—fastest-growing demographic, some students and professors believe that Harvard is falling behind.

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The Supreme Court Could Strike Down Laws Said To Discriminate Against White People

Monday, October 1st, 2012

(Business Insider) The U.S. Supreme Court resumes work on Monday, confronting a caseload that could prove every bit as contentious as the legal battle over healthcare reform.

 

Among the most bitterly fought cases are expected to be a number aimed at overturning longstanding civil rights laws by a clutch of Republican-run states who claim they are outdated and unjustly discriminatory against white people.

The cases have the potential to strike at the heart of more than half a century of civil rights legislation by potentially abolishing central government oversight of elections in states with a history of systematic racism and dealing a fatal blow to affirmative action in higher education.

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As Hispanic college enrollment steadily climbs, local colleges prepare

Saturday, September 15th, 2012

 

(Las Vegas Sun) Over the past four decades, the Hispanic portion of U.S. college enrollment has steadily increased, and for the first time ever, Hispanics are the largest minority group on college campuses, a new report indicates.

In Southern Nevada, institutions are executing plans to boost Hispanic enrollment and increase support services for minority students. Not only are the initiatives important to address the shifting demographics of Nevada’s schools, but they also could lead to one or more of the local colleges receiving federal Hispanic Serving Institution status, which can open doors to more funding.

According to a Pew Research Center report released in August, the number of 18- to 24-year-old Hispanics enrolled in college in the United States exceeded 2 million and reached a record 16.5 percent of all U.S. college enrollments in 2011. In 1972, the Hispanic share of U.S. college enrollments was 2.9 percent.

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Should Asians Be Excluded From Affirmative Action Programs/Diversity Scholarships In The United States?

Tuesday, September 4th, 2012

 

(Forbes) No.

The argument for race-conscious affirmative action is that, all other factors being equal, people of color still experience obstacles to pursuing an education based on subtle discrimination in policy or daily practice. This certainly applies to Asian Americans.Sure, the benefit given to an affluent Asian student should not be as great as that given to a lower-income Asian student, but I’m open to the possibility that this affluent Asian student still experiences more educational obstacles than similarly affluent white students.

The basis of an affirmative action policy that evaluates race must consider the unique challenges experienced by Asian students. Consider the Asian American student population, which is widely diverse. Many students’ parents are immigrants. Some are immigrants themselves. While some students’ parents immigrated as college or graduate students themselves, others immigrated as refugees or migrant workers. Asian American households experience longer periods of continuous unemployment than any other group.[1] Many Asian American parents do not have English fluency, which limits civic participation. Asian Americans experience employment discrimination in a variety of sectors after graduation, as do their parents.[2] The proportion of legacy applicants among Asian students is much lower than that among white students, due to historically restrictive immigration.

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Latinos Top Minority College Enrollment, Pew Hispanic Center Finds

Saturday, August 25th, 2012

 

(National Journal) In 2011, Latinos for the first time became the largest minority group in four-year colleges and universities across the United States, according to a Pew Hispanic Center report.

The number of 18- to-24-year-old Latinos enrolled in college surpassed 2 million in 2011, accounting for 16.5 percent of the student population. The increase may be associated as much with population growth as with modest gains in high school graduation rates, according to the report released on Monday by the nonpartisan research center.

High school graduation rates reached an all-time high for Latinos in 2011, the Pew study found. The number of Latinos earning a high school diploma or General Education Development certificate increased to 76 percent in 2011, up from 73 percent in 2010, researchers said. Nearly 47 percent of those graduates were enrolled in a two-year community college or four-year undergraduate program.

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