Archive for the ‘Asian American’ Category

College Board apologizes over ‘racially insensitive’ T-shirt

Tuesday, July 15th, 2014

(USAToday) The College Board apologized for a "culturally and racially insensitive" T-shirt and some comments made at its Advanced Placement World History exam grading event last month.

On the front of the shirt are caricatures of Chinese politicians with the words, "Chinese Communist PARTY!!!" On the back is an image of Mao Zedong and text in what critics of the T-shirt call a "chop suey font."

"It hearkens to this history of racist imagery," said Hannah Kim, an assistant professor of history at the University of Delaware and one of the AP exam readers, in an interview with USA TODAY Network.

Kim was one of more than 1,000 college professors and high school teachers who gathered in Salt Lake City in mid-June for a week-long event to read and grade AP World History exams. It's common to have commemorative T-shirts at these grading events, and often these T-shirts are "innocuous," Kim said.

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TMZ Under Fire for Asian Driver Comments

Friday, June 13th, 2014

(thewrap.com) TMZ is being slammed by an Asian American organization that's demanding an apology from the show for comments made about Asian drivers.

The Media Action Network for Asian Americans (MANAA) is taking aim at the celebrity gossip show for a segment featuring “Step Up 3D” actor Joe Slaughter. During the segment, a TMZ reporter asked Slaughter about Korea creating larger parking stalls to make it easier for Korean women to park.

Quoth Slaughter, “I think America should do that for Asian people in general. Stereotypes aren't stereotypes because they're unfalse [sic].  They're stereotypes because we know for a fact that things like that happen.”

Cut to the TMZ set, where a staffer chimed in, “But you know what?  My roommate is Asian. She is full blown Chinese. And she openly talks about how she is a bad driver.  And she does blame it on her genetics because of her eyes. It's not something that's a bad thing if you — you know, maybe someone can be born with a big nose and you can't turn all the way…”

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The tiger mom DOESN’T know best: Researchers find Western parenting methods are just as effective

Wednesday, May 28th, 2014

(Daily Mail) Stanford researchers Alyssa Fu and Hazel Markus suggest in a new study, both culture-centric approaches can be effective. 

Motivation, the researchers wrote, is understood to come from within an individual in Western families, while Asian children find strength in parental expectations. 

The bottom line is that children can be motivated either way, they say.

'These findings underscore the importance of understanding cultural variation in how people construe themselves and their relationships to others. 

'While European American parents give their children wings to fly on their own, Asian American parents provide a constant wind beneath their children's wings,' wrote Fu, a doctoral student in psychology and the lead author of the study, and Markus, a professor of psychology.

The debate was sparked in 2011, when Yale law Professor Amy Chua provoked a cultural clash with a Wall Street Journal article, 'Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior,' that advocated a strict approach – 'tiger parenting' – common in East Asia.

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Study examines achievement gap between Asian American, white students

Wednesday, May 14th, 2014

(Los Angeles Times) A growing achievement gap between Asian American students and their white classmates is due largely to greater work effort and cultural attitudes, not innate cognitive ability, researchers say.

In a study published Monday in the journal PNAS, two sociology professors found that Asian Americans enter school with no clear academic edge over whites, but that an advantage grows over time.

Even if they come from poorer, less educated families, Asian Americans significantly outperform white students by fifth grade, authors wrote.

"What accounts for Asians' greater academic effort than whites?" asked study authors Amy Hsin of Queens College in New York and Yu Xie of the University of Michigan.

"Asian and Asian American youth are harder working because of cultural beliefs that emphasize the strong connection between effort and achievement," the authors wrote. "Studies show that Asian and Asian American students tend to view cognitive abilities as qualities that can be developed through effort, whereas white Americans tend to view cognitive abilities as qualities that are inborn."

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Are US universities choosing rich Chinese students over Asian Americans?

Monday, May 5th, 2014

(QZ.com) An editorial in the Chinese financial magazine Caixin points out another potential obstacle for Asian Americans trying to get into college: hundreds of thousands of wealthy Chinese students that are flocking to US schools every year.

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American universities, especially elite schools, have been suspected of admitting a disproportionately low number of Asian American students given their high test scores and academic performance. Over the past five to six years, these schools—faced with less private and public funding—have also started depending on international students who pay full tuition to pick up the bill. “Asian Americans now face a double barrier to entry at US universities,” writes the Caixin author Wu Yuci.

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Of this pack of international students, Chinese nationals are leading the charge. As China’s economy has developed, more wealthy families are choosing to send their children to American schools. (The daughter of current Chinese president Xi Jinping attends Harvard under a pseudonym, and the son of deposed Chinese official Bo Xilai attended Columbia and Harvard.)

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Asian American group tries to reconnect with GOP, citing shared core values

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

(Foxnews) A group of Asian Americans is starting a grassroots effort to garner support for the Republican Party and its candidates, saying the GOP most closely aligns with their core values including family, education and entrepreneurship.

The group, the Asian Republican Coalition, is co-founded by international investment banker John Ying, who during the 2012 presidential election cycle served on the Republican National Finance Committee.

“We need a forum, and this first step will go a long way,” Ying told FoxNews.com earlier this week.

He hopes the effort, which will include a May 6 kickoff event at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., will provide a “friendly front door” for both potential voters and Republican lawmakers and officials.

While much of the Republican Party’s focus has recently been to trying to connect with Hispanic voters, considering Democratic President Obama won 71 percent of their vote in his re-election victory, Asians are the country’s fastest-growing ethnic group, according to a 2012 U.S. Census report.

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New report details racial gap among US children

Friday, April 4th, 2014

(AP) – In every region of America, white and Asian children are far better positioned for success than black, Latino and American Indian children, according to a new report appealing for urgent action to bridge this racial gap.

Titled "Race for Results," the report is being released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which for decades has worked to improve child well-being in the United States.

The foundation also produces annual "Kids Count" reports, with reams of state-specific data, but these generally have not focused on race. The new report tackles the topic head-on, with charts and ratings that convey dramatic racial discrepancies.

At the core of the report is a newly devised index based on 12 indicators measuring a child's success from birth to adulthood. The indicators include reading and math proficiency, high school graduation data, teen birthrates, employment prospects, family income and education levels, and neighborhood poverty levels.

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We need more Asian American kids growing up to be artists, not doctors

Sunday, March 30th, 2014

(Guardian) Americans often measure success by the three M’s: money, Motorola, and Mercedes. Most Chinese immigrant parents, on the other hand, define success as getting straight A’s, graduating from an elite university, pursuing an advanced degree and becoming a doctor, lawyer, pharmacist or engineer.

Could this be why the children of Chinese immigrants are, on average, better educated and wealthier – with higher paying jobs – than the general US population?

Amy Chua (of Tiger Mother fame) and her husband and co-author, Jed Rubenfeld, seem to think so. In their new book, The Triple Packagethey compare differences in educational qualifications, median household income and occupational status to support their claim that certain American groups – including those of Chinese, Jewish, Cuban and Nigerian descent – are more successful than others because they share certain cultural traits: a superiority complex; inferiority; impulse control.

But just because these groups have achieved “success” doesn’t mean that these traits are responsible for it, nor that the high-paying, professional job is even what Chinese Americans and other Asian Americans aspire to achieve.

In our new study of Chinese, Vietnamese and Mexican Americans in Los Angeles, sociologist Min Zhou and I found that Chinese immigrants are not only more educated than the average American – they’re also more highly educated than those they left behind. As highly educated immigrants, Chinese parents define success narrowly; more importantly, they invest their resources in achieving it.

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Chinese-Americans wooed by the GOP over anti-affirmative action in public universities

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

(San Jose Mercury News) Chinese-Americans were exhorted Sunday to redouble their opposition to the proposed California constitutional amendment that would reinstate affirmative action in public universities.

If passed by the Legislature and then by state voters, Senate Constitutional Amendment 5 would jeopardize their children's chances of being admitted to state universities, opponents told more than 150 people gathered at a "Stop SCA 5" forum at the Cupertino Community Center.

"It would be a serious mistake to let the Latino caucus secure the vote of all Democrats," said Ward Connerly, author of Proposition 209, which SCA 5 would overturn. Connerly's proposition outlawed consideration of race in University of California and California State University admissions. He called SCA 5 "a violation of all democratic principles."

Frank Lee, of the conservative Pacific Justice Institute, said, "No student should be favored or degraded because of race." He vowed that the institute would sue if the initiative passed.

Proponents have said that SCA 5 would simply allow admissions officers to consider applicants' race.

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“Entrenched anti-Semitic views” very rare among whites and Asian Americans, common among blacks and Latinos

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

(Washington Post) According to this article, ADL surveys show that “approximately 12 percent of Americans hold deeply entrenched anti-Semitic views.” However, over 30% of African Americans and Latinos hold such views. Given that they are almost 30% of the population, this suggests that of the 12% of Americans who hold deeply entrenched anti-Semitic views, 9% or so are African Americans or Latinos. This means, in turn, of the 70% or so of the population that is not African American or Latino, only 3% hold deeply entrenched anti-Semitic views. Put another way, less than 5% of whites, Asians, and “others” (including Native Americans) combined hold deeply entrenched anti-Semitic views, compared to over 30% of African Americans and Latinos–or at least that’s the difference in percentages of those willing to express anti-Semitic attitudes to pollsters. Regardless, it seems odd given these numbers that Jews seem especially concerned about mostly phantom anti-Semitism emanating from white evangelical Christians, while being less concerned about anti-Semitism in core Democratic constituencies. But,as Ilya pointed out a few years back, many studies show that people tend to devalue or ignore any information that makes their political adversaries look good, while overvaluing anything that looks bad.

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