Archive for the ‘Hispanic/Latino American’ Category

Latino activists aim to boost participation in U.S. midterm vote

Friday, July 11th, 2014

(Reuters) – A coalition of Latino groups is launching a new push to register voters and mobilize Hispanics ahead of the 2014 midterm elections in the hope of electing more lawmakers sympathetic to issues important to them, including immigration.

At a news conference to open the annual convention of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), advocates announced the goal of registering 50,000 new Latino voters and mobilizing 100,000 voters to go to the polls in November.

Advocates say they hope disenchantment with Washington will drive a higher turnout.

President Barack Obama's drive for Congress to pass a comprehensive immigration overhaul this year collapsed when House of Representatives Speaker John Boehner, the top Republican in Washington, said the House would not hold a vote.

Full story…

Latino activists aim to boost participation in U.S. midterm vote

US settles credit discrimination suit against bank

Saturday, June 28th, 2014

(AP) — GE Capital Retail Bank has agreed to pay $169 million to settle a lawsuit that accused it of discriminating against Hispanic credit card customers, the Justice Department said Thursday.

The Justice Department called it the largest government credit-card discrimination settlement ever. The department joined the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in announcing the agreement.

In addition, GE Capital must refund $56 million to about 638,000 consumers who were subjected to deceptive marketing practices to promote extra credit-card products known as "add-ons," in an agreement with the CFPB. The practices included falsely marketing products as free of charge, failing to tell consumers that they didn't qualify for the offers because they were retired or disabled, failing to make it clear that consumers were making a purchase and falsely telling them the offers were for a limited time only.

GE Capital also is paying a $3.5 million penalty to the CFPB for deceptive marketing.

The $169 million settlement resolves allegations that the bank excluded Hispanic borrowers from two of its credit card debt-repayment programs. The programs allowed customers with delinquent accounts to settle their balances by paying off a specific portion of the debt. That denied a significant benefit to all customers who had expressed a preference to communicate with the bank in Spanish or had a mailing address in Puerto Rico – even if they met the criteria for the programs, the government said.

Full story…

US settles credit discrimination suit against bank

Majority of Latino Workers Are Now U.S.-Born — Not Immigrants

Thursday, June 26th, 2014

(Wall Street Journal) Immigrants still make up a big share of Hispanic workers in the U.S., but more often than not, they’re born in the U.S.A.

For the first time in nearly two decades, the majority of America’s Latino workers are U.S.-born, according to a report by the Pew Research Center released on Thursday.

Just under half–49.7%–of Hispanic workers were foreign-born at the end of 2013, down from 56.1% in 2007 and slightly below 1995’s level of 50.5%, Pew says. And early evidence suggests the trend is continuing this year, pushing the share of immigrants among America’s roughly 22 million Hispanic workers to 48.8%.

Full story…

Majority of Latino Workers Are Now U.S.-Born — Not Immigrants

On The Census, Who Checks ‘Hispanic,’ Who Checks ‘White,’ And Why

Friday, June 20th, 2014

(NPR) We've been talking a lot lately about how who fills out the Census in what way. It's an ongoing preoccupation of Code Switch, and one shared by Julie Dowling. Dowling, a University of Illinois sociologist, whose book, Mexican Americans and the Question of Race, came out earlier this year. (As the daughter of a Mexican-American mother and Irish-American father, Dowling knows all about the complexities of filling out the race question on the Census form.)

I interviewed Dowling about her research, and she shared some fascinating insights about the gap between how people fill in Census forms and how they think of themselves

On the history of 'Hispanic' on the Census Questionnaire

In 1930, "Mexican" was put on the Census [questionnaire] as a race. This was during the Depression and it was a time period when [the government was] rounding up people. They used the Census in the 1940s to locate Japanese-Americans for internment camps. So people didn't want to be identifiable on the Census because they were afraid of the government.

Full story…

On The Census, Who Checks ‘Hispanic,’ Who Checks ‘White,’ And Why

Obama taps Castro for Cabinet, boost to Democrat

Monday, May 26th, 2014

(AP) — In a second-term Cabinet reshuffle, President Barack Obama tapped San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro on Friday to be the nation's next housing secretary, giving a prominent national platform to one of the Democratic Party's most celebrated up-and-comers.

Joined by Castro and Vice President Joe Biden, Obama also announced he was nominating current Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan to run the White House budget office – an opening Obama created when he asked his former budget chief to take over the Health and Human Services Department last month.

"Just because you are of modest means does not mean that your aspirations or your opportunity ought to be limited, and it certainly means you can have the talent to succeed and achieve the American Dream," Castro said as he accepted the nomination in the State Dining Room of the White House.

The 39-year-old Castro was propelled into the national spotlight two years ago when Obama chose him to deliver the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention – a political baptism by fire not unlike the president's own rise to prominence when Obama keynoted the 2004 convention. Friday's announcement gives another major boost to Castro's profile, just as Democrats are eyeing him as a potential vice presidential candidate in 2016.

Full story…

Obama taps Castro for Cabinet, boost to Democrat

Which is it, Hispanic or Latino?

Friday, May 16th, 2014

(CNN) – If there's one thing everyone should know about Hispanics in the United States, it's that this rapidly growing minority has an undefined identity crisis.

Why? Because of the confusion surrounding what to call people whose ethnic background is from Latin American and Spanish-speaking countries. Some even feel 100% American or 100% Latino — or Hispanic, depending to whom you're talking.

How do you know which term to use? "Hispanic" and "Latino" are often used interchangeably and aim to describe the same group of people, but technically they do not mean the same thing.

What's more, within Hispanic communities in the United States, most people identify with their country of origin and often use hyphens to represent their loyalties to both cultures: like "Mexican-American."

Full story…

Which is it, Hispanic or Latino?

New report details racial gap among US children

Friday, April 4th, 2014

(AP) – In every region of America, white and Asian children are far better positioned for success than black, Latino and American Indian children, according to a new report appealing for urgent action to bridge this racial gap.

Titled "Race for Results," the report is being released Tuesday by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, which for decades has worked to improve child well-being in the United States.

The foundation also produces annual "Kids Count" reports, with reams of state-specific data, but these generally have not focused on race. The new report tackles the topic head-on, with charts and ratings that convey dramatic racial discrepancies.

At the core of the report is a newly devised index based on 12 indicators measuring a child's success from birth to adulthood. The indicators include reading and math proficiency, high school graduation data, teen birthrates, employment prospects, family income and education levels, and neighborhood poverty levels.

Full story…

New report details racial gap among US children

Uninsured rate drops due to health care law, but signups lag among Hispanics

Saturday, March 15th, 2014

(PBS) The share of Americans without health insurance is dropping to the lowest levels since President Barack Obama took office, but sign-ups under his health care law lag among Hispanics — a big pool of potential beneficiaries.

With just three weeks left to enroll on the new insurance exchanges, the Gallup-Healthways Well-Being Index, finds that 15.9 percent of U.S. adults are uninsured thus far in 2014, down from 17.1 percent for the last three months — or calendar quarter— of 2013.

Released Monday, the survey based on more than 28,000 interviews is a major independent effort to track the health care rollout. The drop of 1.2 percentage points in the uninsured rate translates to about 3 million people gaining coverage.

Gallup said the proportion of Americans who are uninsured is on track to drop to the lowest quarterly level it measured since 2008, before Obama took office.

“It’s probably a reasonable hypothesis that the Affordable Care Act is having something to do with this drop,” said Frank Newport, Gallup’s editor-in-chief. “We saw a continuation of the trend we saw last month; it didn’t bounce back up.”

The survey found that almost every major demographic group made progress getting health insurance, although Hispanics lagged.

Full story…

Uninsured rate drops due to health care law, but signups lag among Hispanics

How Advocates Are Trying To Protect The Right To Vote

Tuesday, March 4th, 2014

(Huffington Post) When the U.S. Supreme Court struck down a key part of the Voting Rights Act last June, justices left it to Congress to decide how to fix the law. But while Congress deliberates, activists are turning again to the courts: At least 10 lawsuits have the potential to bring states and some local jurisdictions back under federal oversight 2013 essentially doing an end-run around the Supreme Court's ruling.

A quick refresher: The Voting Rights Act outlaws racial discrimination against voters. But the law's real strength comes from its "preclearance" provision, which forces jurisdictions with a history of racial discrimination to submit new voting measures to the federal government for approval.

In last summer's Shelby County v. Holder ruling, the Supreme Court threw out the part of the law that spelled out when states were automatically subject to federal oversight. States that have been released from preclearance have already passed a rash of new restrictive voting measures, as ProPublica reported earlier.

Enter the lawsuits, which hinge on a different part of the Voting Rights Act, the so-called "bail-in" provision. It lets federal courts impose preclearance if a state or local jurisdiction violates the Constitution's 14th or 15th amendments, which guarantee equal protection and the right to vote.

Full story…

How Advocates Are Trying To Protect The Right To Vote

“Entrenched anti-Semitic views” very rare among whites and Asian Americans, common among blacks and Latinos

Wednesday, February 26th, 2014

(Washington Post) According to this article, ADL surveys show that “approximately 12 percent of Americans hold deeply entrenched anti-Semitic views.” However, over 30% of African Americans and Latinos hold such views. Given that they are almost 30% of the population, this suggests that of the 12% of Americans who hold deeply entrenched anti-Semitic views, 9% or so are African Americans or Latinos. This means, in turn, of the 70% or so of the population that is not African American or Latino, only 3% hold deeply entrenched anti-Semitic views. Put another way, less than 5% of whites, Asians, and “others” (including Native Americans) combined hold deeply entrenched anti-Semitic views, compared to over 30% of African Americans and Latinos–or at least that’s the difference in percentages of those willing to express anti-Semitic attitudes to pollsters. Regardless, it seems odd given these numbers that Jews seem especially concerned about mostly phantom anti-Semitism emanating from white evangelical Christians, while being less concerned about anti-Semitism in core Democratic constituencies. But,as Ilya pointed out a few years back, many studies show that people tend to devalue or ignore any information that makes their political adversaries look good, while overvaluing anything that looks bad.

Full story…

“Entrenched anti-Semitic views” very rare among whites and Asian Americans, common among blacks and Latinos
Subscribe to RSS feed