Posts Tagged ‘black’

Proud Black teens do better in school

Sunday, January 6th, 2013

(Futurity.org) New research shows that when parents use racial socialization—talking to their children or engaging in activities that promote feelings of racial knowledge, pride, and connection—it offsets racial discrimination’s potentially negative impact on students’ academic development.

Preparing adolescents for possible bias is also a protective factor, though a combination of this preparation and racial socialization is ideal in moderating the possible damaging effects of racial discrimination by teachers or fellow students, according to a study published in the journal Child Development.

Our findings challenge the notion that ‘race blindness’ is a universally ideal parenting approach, especially since previous research has shown that racially conscious parenting strategies at either extreme—either ‘race blindness’ or promoting mistrust of other races—are associated with negative outcomes for African American youth,” says lead author Ming-Te Wang, assistant professor of psychology in education at the University of Pittsburgh, who coauthored the study with Harvard University’s James P. Huguley.

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Anti-black views rise, poll finds

Tuesday, October 30th, 2012

(FortWayne.com) Racial attitudes have not improved in the four years since the United States elected its first black president, an Associated Press poll finds, as a slight majority of Americans now express prejudice toward blacks whether they recognize those feelings or not.

Those views could cost President Obama votes as he tries for re-election, the survey found, though the effects are mitigated by some people’s more favorable views of blacks.

Racial prejudice has increased slightly since 2008 whether those feelings were measured using questions that explicitly asked respondents about racist attitudes, or through an experimental test that measured implicit views toward race without asking questions about that topic directly.

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Advertisers aren’t tapping into strong African American market, report says

Tuesday, September 25th, 2012

(Washington Post) Even after absorbing a devastating economic hit from the Great Recession, black consumers remain a potent force but are often overlooked by advertisers, according to anew research report.

African Americans are projected to have a combined spending power of $1.1 trillion by 2015, according to the report released on Friday by the market-research firm Nielsen and the National Newspaper Publishers Association, which represents 200 black-oriented newspapers.

As a group, African Americans have a set of spending habits and brand loyalty that should be attractive to advertisers. More than other demographic groups, blacks tend to buy “brand-name” products, watch television and spend time shopping or frequenting fast-food restaurants, the report said.

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Black Women Face Health Discrimination in America

Friday, September 14th, 2012

 

(Forbes) “Ain’t I a Woman?” This question is attributed to Sojourner Truth‘s speech at a women’s convention in 1851. And it’s a question that’s still relevant to African American women in 2012, as demonstrated by first lady Michelle Obama‘s speech at the Democratic National Convention this week where she touched upon health care and women’s choices.

When it comes to women’s health and rights, more black women need to be a part of the conversation. We have to be included in discussions on health because women of color regardless of class are disproportionately affected by major health crises affecting U.S. women.

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Work Disappearing for Black Males in Urban America

Monday, September 10th, 2012

(Philly1.com) During the past four decades, the job market for working age African American males has fundamentally collapsed in urban America.

That’s the conclusion of a recent study by Dr. Marc Levine at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He looked at “employment rates” in forty of the nation’s largest metropolitan areas based on every Census taken from 1970 to 2010.

The results are shared in “Race and Male Employment in Wake of the Great Recession: Black Male…“. The findings are stunning and should be a wake-up call to the entire nation, particularly community activists, policymakers, media and the Black community.

Black male employment is a crisis with no solutions on the table and faint discussion of the problem. Levine finds that in five of the nation’s largest metropolitan areas, fewer than half of the working-age Black males held jobs. The US Census defines “working age” as 16-64, and “prime working years” as 25-54. In Milwaukee, the Black male employment rate in 2010 (latest year available) was over 20 points lower than the Hispanic male rate and 32.7 percentage points lower than that of white males.

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Gripes aside, blacks still back Obama

Saturday, September 8th, 2012

(Politico) African Americans still take pride in President Barack Obama’s election — but four years later, they’re also still looking for results.

Recalling the hopes and dreams of 2008, they’re left wondering what happened to the Obama who stood for helping the poor, bringing down inner city violence and advocating for them. There are complaints that he didn’t invite every black leader to every event they wanted to be at, attend every black group’s convention, or prioritize every concern brought to him by the Congressional Black Caucus.

In office, Obama’s interactions with the African-American community have largely taken two forms: controversies — including just last month, when he was forced to defend Vice President Joe Biden’s “chains” comment — and paying tribute to the civil rights movement and its leaders.

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Unemployment rises among black Americans, figures show

Tuesday, July 10th, 2012

 

(The Guardian) One of the most jarring figures in the labour statistics is a rise in unemployment among African Americans, from 13.6% to 14.4%, double the rate for the white population.

The proportion of white Americans out of work was static at 7.4%, and while the jobless rate for Latinos remained high at 11%, it too was unchanged from May.

Algernon Austin, the director of the race, ethnicity and economy programme at the Economic Policy Institute, said the figure for black Americans had been hovering at or above 14% for the past three years, even with a 'recovery' supposedly under way. "It is an extremely high rate to be stuck at," Austin said. "That is the really important news."

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Childhood abuse linked to adult obesity in black women, study says

Saturday, July 7th, 2012

 

(Chicago Tribune) Higher levels of childhood physical or sexual abuse are associated with an increased risk for obesity among adult African American women, researchers said.

It was the first study to look at a large group of African American women for this association, which has been found among women in previous studies, the researchers from Boston University said in the August issue of the journal Pediatrics.

The association was “modest, statistically significant” for women who reported severe abuse early in life. And the researchers note that caregivers could take this into account when working with children to prevent obesity.

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CA High Schools Are Failing Blacks And Latinos, As Few Offer Pathways To College, Report Says

Monday, July 2nd, 2012

 

(Huffington Post) California high schools that serve largely Latino or African American students are failing them as pathways to college, according to a new report by a statewide education policy, research and advocacy organization.

Just 10 percent of high schools that serve primarily Latino students have above-average graduation and college-going rates for Latinos. The same is true for African Americans at 24 percent of high schools serving the largest proportions of African American students, the Education Trust–West found. Many students in both populations are low-income.

The college-going rate among Latino and African American students who graduated high school in 2010 lagged behind that of white and Asian students by 20 and more than 30 percentage points, respectively. The estimate, released last week, found 45 percent of Latinos and 46 percent of African Americans in the class of 2010 enrolled in college.

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The future needs of special education students may be in jeopardy

Saturday, June 30th, 2012

 

(Examiner.com) Many African American students are placed in special education programs because they are believed to have learning disabilities.

Once Water Gill wrote, “The plight of African-American males is a growing concern for many educators, parents, and human service professionals.”

In 2009-2010, the Oakland Unified School District placed 2,354 African-American students in special education programs, and in 2010-2011, 2, 337 African American children were placed in special education programs (http://www.educulturesnotes.blogspot.com/).

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