Posts Tagged ‘college’

Latinos head to college at a record rate, now on par with white students

Friday, May 24th, 2013

(Christian Science Monitor) Latino high school graduates are enrolling in college at an all-time high and, for the first time, at a rate comparable to that of their white peers.

A record 69 percent of Latino students enrolled in college after their 2012 high school graduation, according to a new report by the Pew Hispanic Center. Overall, 66 percent of all 2012 high school graduates immediately enrolled in college, but Latinos did so at higher rates than whites (67 percent) and blacks (63 percent), according to preliminary data.

Latinos are the fastest-growing minority population in the US, but the increased rate of Latino students enrolling in college is more than just a demographic trend, says Pew senior research associate Richard Fry. It’s a sign that the education gap is narrowing,

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Latinos head to college at a record rate, now on par with white students

Is the Ivy League Fair to Asian Americans?

Tuesday, January 15th, 2013

(The Atlantic) Are Ivy League institutions discriminating against Asian Americans by limiting how many are admitted? That's the subject of a debate published this week in the New York Times. Let's start with the folks who believe that there's effectively a race-based quota limiting Asian Americans.

Ron Unz makes the most powerful argument for that proposition. "After the Justice Department closed an investigation in the early 1990s into charges that Harvard University discriminated against Asian-American applicants, Harvard's reported enrollment of Asian-Americans began gradually declining, falling from 20.6 percent in 1993 to about 16.5 percent over most of the last decade," he writes. "This decline might seem small. But these same years brought a huge increase in America's college-age Asian population, which roughly doubled between 1992 and 2011, while non-Hispanic white numbers remained almost unchanged. Thus, according to official statistics, the percentage of Asian-Americans enrolled at Harvard fell by more than 50 percent over the last two decades, while the percentage of whites changed little. This decline in relative Asian-American enrollment was actually larger than the impact of Harvard's 1925 Jewish quota, which reduced Jewish freshmen from 27.6 percent to 15 percent."

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Is the Ivy League Fair to Asian Americans?

Harvard University Students Feel Latino Community Is ‘Neglected’ On Campus

Thursday, October 4th, 2012

(Harvard Crimson) Harvard was missing something. Surrounded by peers at the annual Latino Ivy League Conference in Ithaca last November, Daniel J. Artiga ’15 came to this realization: As students active in the Latino community described the resources provided on their respective campuses, he had little to add. “Yale spoke, Brown spoke, they all had something great to say,” he remembers. But then it was Harvard’s turn. “The other delegates and I mentioned how it would be awkward beforehand, because we didn’t have a lot to say,” recalled Artiga, vice president of the Latino Men’s Collective. “But it didn’t hit me until I was actually sitting in a room listening to other students bragging about how well their Latino community is treated—and how ours is, I feel, neglected.”

Harvard prides itself on being at the vanguard of new inquiry. Yet when it comes to the study and support of the nation’s—and higher education’s—fastest-growing demographic, some students and professors believe that Harvard is falling behind.

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Harvard University Students Feel Latino Community Is ‘Neglected’ On Campus

As Hispanic college enrollment steadily climbs, local colleges prepare

Saturday, September 15th, 2012

 

(Las Vegas Sun) Over the past four decades, the Hispanic portion of U.S. college enrollment has steadily increased, and for the first time ever, Hispanics are the largest minority group on college campuses, a new report indicates.

In Southern Nevada, institutions are executing plans to boost Hispanic enrollment and increase support services for minority students. Not only are the initiatives important to address the shifting demographics of Nevada’s schools, but they also could lead to one or more of the local colleges receiving federal Hispanic Serving Institution status, which can open doors to more funding.

According to a Pew Research Center report released in August, the number of 18- to 24-year-old Hispanics enrolled in college in the United States exceeded 2 million and reached a record 16.5 percent of all U.S. college enrollments in 2011. In 1972, the Hispanic share of U.S. college enrollments was 2.9 percent.

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As Hispanic college enrollment steadily climbs, local colleges prepare

Should Asians Be Excluded From Affirmative Action Programs/Diversity Scholarships In The United States?

Tuesday, September 4th, 2012

 

(Forbes) No.

The argument for race-conscious affirmative action is that, all other factors being equal, people of color still experience obstacles to pursuing an education based on subtle discrimination in policy or daily practice. This certainly applies to Asian Americans.Sure, the benefit given to an affluent Asian student should not be as great as that given to a lower-income Asian student, but I’m open to the possibility that this affluent Asian student still experiences more educational obstacles than similarly affluent white students.

The basis of an affirmative action policy that evaluates race must consider the unique challenges experienced by Asian students. Consider the Asian American student population, which is widely diverse. Many students’ parents are immigrants. Some are immigrants themselves. While some students’ parents immigrated as college or graduate students themselves, others immigrated as refugees or migrant workers. Asian American households experience longer periods of continuous unemployment than any other group.[1] Many Asian American parents do not have English fluency, which limits civic participation. Asian Americans experience employment discrimination in a variety of sectors after graduation, as do their parents.[2] The proportion of legacy applicants among Asian students is much lower than that among white students, due to historically restrictive immigration.

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Should Asians Be Excluded From Affirmative Action Programs/Diversity Scholarships In The United States?

Latinos Top Minority College Enrollment, Pew Hispanic Center Finds

Saturday, August 25th, 2012

 

(National Journal) In 2011, Latinos for the first time became the largest minority group in four-year colleges and universities across the United States, according to a Pew Hispanic Center report.

The number of 18- to-24-year-old Latinos enrolled in college surpassed 2 million in 2011, accounting for 16.5 percent of the student population. The increase may be associated as much with population growth as with modest gains in high school graduation rates, according to the report released on Monday by the nonpartisan research center.

High school graduation rates reached an all-time high for Latinos in 2011, the Pew study found. The number of Latinos earning a high school diploma or General Education Development certificate increased to 76 percent in 2011, up from 73 percent in 2010, researchers said. Nearly 47 percent of those graduates were enrolled in a two-year community college or four-year undergraduate program.

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Latinos Top Minority College Enrollment, Pew Hispanic Center Finds

Study Examines College Experience of Immigrants, Offspring

Wednesday, July 25th, 2012

 

(WNYC) A new national study may yield some clues about how immigrant and second generation Americans differ from all other undergraduates, and from each other, when they get to college.

The study (PDF) for the U.S. government's National Center for Education Statistics examined students from six states including New York, where 35 percent of college students were either first- or second-generation immigrants.

The foreign-born population in the U.S tripled between 1970 and 2007. A little more than a quarter of all adults aged 25 and older had bachelor's degrees in 2007, regardless of whether or not they were foreign born. But 44 percent of foreign-born? adults had enrolled in college compared to 56 percent of the U.S. born population.

Among undergraduates who were born abroad or whose parents were immigrants, the dominant ethnic groups are Hispanics and Asians.

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Study Examines College Experience of Immigrants, Offspring

Will Affirmative Action Disappear?

Wednesday, July 18th, 2012

 

(AlterNet) The most conservative Supreme Court in the past four decades is poised to overturn the already limited affirmative action provisions in the latter part of this year (after October 1) unless good sense visits one or two of them and they vote in favor of student body diversity instead of against it. Since Bush-appointed justices John Roberts and Samuel Alito have joined the court as chief justice and associate justice, respectively, the court has voiced hostility to government uses of race.

The case, Fisher v. University of Texas, was brought by one Abigail Noel Fisher, a white student who did not qualify for the Texas Top Ten Percent plan, which automatically admits the top 10 percent of every high school class in Texas to the University of Texas.

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Will Affirmative Action Disappear?

Asian American Students Push for Greater Respect on Campus

Sunday, July 15th, 2012

 

(Alternet) When Twitter accounts “Purdue Asians” and “Kim Jong Il” (with the handles @OrientalSwag and @Purdue_Asian, respectively) started tweeting things like “I sreep for entire crass & stir get better grades than you! :D ” Asian American students at Purdue found another reason to sign a petition being circulated for the establishment of an Asian/Asian American cultural center on campus.

 

 

“What affected me the most about the account was it was branded Purdue. I chose to go to this school and to see my culture being mocked hurt,” said Tamara Dizon, a sophomore who has been spearheading efforts to create an Asian/Asian American cultural center at her school.

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Asian American Students Push for Greater Respect on Campus

Graduates from ethnic minorities face an even harder time

Friday, July 6th, 2012

 

(The Guardian) Life for an ethnic minority graduate in 2012 isn't easy. Each step along the way to finding a graduate job, from deciding if it's financially viable to go to university in the first place, to applying for a place and then finding a job afterwards, ethnic minority students are at a distinct disadvantage. The discrepancies are shocking.

Some tuition fees have trebled, putting a university education out of reach for many, and if you come from an ethnic minority background you are twice as likely to be in a low-income household. Being able to afford university is just the first challenge for ethnic minority students.

Full story…

Graduates from ethnic minorities face an even harder time
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