Posts Tagged ‘nfl’

Roger Goodell: Minority hiring rate ‘not acceptable’

Saturday, February 2nd, 2013

 

(NFL.com) The Rooney Rule has been a hot topic of conversation after a hiring cycle that included no minority hires among the 15 new head coaches and general managers this offseason.

At his state of the league news conference Friday, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell made it clear that the results were "not acceptable."

"The Rooney Rule has been very effective," Goodell said. "We have to look to see what the next generation is. We have to take it to another level."

Full story…

Roger Goodell: Minority hiring rate ‘not acceptable’

Chris Rock can’t believe no minority NFL coaches hired

Sunday, January 20th, 2013

 

(USAToday) In the year 2013 in America, when the NFL has eight head-coaching vacancies, how is it even possible that not one of those positions is filled by a person of color?

And yet that is what happened, and since it did, surely that question was on the mind of comedian Chris Rock when he tweeted this to his 1.5 million followers Friday night:

Andy Reid wins 4 games and everybody wants him Lovie smith wins 10 games and can't get a job.

Seriously, what's up with that?

Of course, this issue of the NFL's lack of minority coaches — there will be just four next season — isn't that simple. But Rock has a point here.

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Chris Rock can’t believe no minority NFL coaches hired

Latino NFL Greats And Super Bowl Stars

Monday, February 6th, 2012

(Huffington Post) With all the attention that New York Giants' emerging star receiver, Victor Cruz, is receiving these days — both for being a local New Jersey boy 'done good', and for his effusive salsa dancing in the end zone — people may forget that the NFL has been home to many great Latino players, including a good number of Hall of Famers and a couple of Super Bowl stars.

For starters, this weekend's super match pits two boricuas, Cruz with the NY Giants, and his New England Patriots' counterpart, tight end Aaron Hernández. Either could be breakout stars and be key to their team's victory.

Full story…

Latino NFL Greats And Super Bowl Stars

At Some N.F.L. Positions, Stereotypes Create Prototypes

Monday, December 12th, 2011

(New York Times) During a screening of a movie about the Tuskegee Airmen on Saturday, it finally occurred to me why the absence of white cornerbacks in the N.F.L. — or the presence of so many black ones — presents a compelling snapshot of the American condition.

Often, in reaction to an article about the lack of black quarterbacks or the lack of black coaches and executives, critics point out indignantly that there are no white cornerbacks, either. The disappearance of the white cornerback has more to do with shrunken aspirations, a lack of confidence and a reluctance to compete.

Cornerback at the N.F.L. level is the most challenging position in sports. It demands extraordinary speed and quickness. Like fighter pilots, cornerbacks must possess an unusual blend of physical strength and emotional toughness, the ability to think and act quickly under pressure.

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At Some N.F.L. Positions, Stereotypes Create Prototypes

Tim Tebow: If Tebow Was African-American, Would He Be a Starting QB in the NFL?

Friday, November 18th, 2011

(Bleacher Report) Denver Broncos head coach John Fox recently stated about his quarterback Tim Tebow, "If we were trying to run a regular offense, he'd be screwed."

Nice vote of confidence, huh?

Let’s face it folks: Even though the Denver Broncos are 3-1 with Tebow as the starting quarterback, it is all but apparent he is not equipped at this point to be a starting quarterback in the NFL.

Period.

Against my Kansas City Chiefs, Tebow completed just 2-of-8 passes for the entire game: Yes, one was for a touchdown, but even a broken clock is right twice a day.  

The Broncos ran the ball a staggering 55 times against the Chiefs defense.  Despite Tebow's inept play the team still managed to win.  Tebow is getting a bulk of the credit but the Broncos defense and running game is putting them in a position to win for the most part, not Tebow’s play.

Despite being a two-time National Champion and a Heisman Trophy winner as a Florida Gator, some felt Tebow’s success would not translate into NFL stardom.  I was one of the doubters.  But for some odd reason Josh McDaniels grabbed Tebow in the first round last year and now Fox is stuck with him.

Full story…

Tim Tebow: If Tebow Was African-American, Would He Be a Starting QB in the NFL?

Hispanic Activists Cry Foul Over Arizona Being Awarded 2015 Super Bowl

Sunday, October 16th, 2011

(FoxNews) The NFL’s decision to pick Arizona this week to host the Super Bowl in 2015 has outraged some Hispanic activists who had organized a boycott of the state after a controversial immigration law passed last year.

“In light of Arizona’s hate-based legislation, the action taken by the NFL serves as an endorsement of the state’s abhorrent actions against the Latino and migrant communities,” said Margaret Moran, national president of the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), the largest Hispanic civil rights group in the country.

“Instead of supporting efforts that would encourage stakeholders and community leaders to build alliances and re-direct state politics away from hate-based legislation, the NFL has chosen to prove an economic shot in the arm to state that will only continue to oppress an already disadvantaged community.”

Full story…

Hispanic Activists Cry Foul Over Arizona Being Awarded 2015 Super Bowl

Can NFL’s Rooney Rule work in corporate America?

Saturday, October 15th, 2011

(AP) Now that the National Football League has a record number of head coaches who are black and Hispanic, can Fortune 500 companies borrow from the league's diversity playbook and see similar results among corporate executives?

Robert L. Johnson, founder of Black Entertainment Television, thinks so. He is urging corporate America to adopt a version of the NFL's Rooney Rule, which requires teams to interview at least one minority candidate when filling head coach and general manager positions.

Currently, seven NFL coaches are black and one is Hispanic. Five general managers are minorities. In 2003, when the rule was implemented, there were three African American NFL head coaches.

Unlike the NFL rule, which is mandatory for teams, Johnson is asking companies to voluntarily adopt a version of the rule.

In Johnson's version, which he calls the RLJ Rule, companies would include at least two African Americans among interviewees for positions of vice president and above and interview at least two black firms when searching for vendor and supplier services contractors.

Full story…

Can NFL’s Rooney Rule work in corporate America?

NFL, Cardinals top the competition in creating Hispanic fans

Saturday, September 17th, 2011

(Phoenix Business Journal) The National Football League  across the country and the Arizona Cardinals in the Phoenix market are stretching their leads over their competitors when it comes to marketing to Hispanic fans and fostering their loyalty.

“Without question, Hispanic sports fans are migrating to the Cardinals in greater numbers,” said Ray Artigue, CEO of the Artigue Agency communications firm in Scottsdale and a former executive with the Phoenix Suns  . “Historically baseball loyalists, Hispanics are also becoming football fans. And, research shows that the NFL is starting to dominate this audience segment.”

Artigue is also former head the sports MBA program at Arizona State University  .

Cardinals vice president Mark Dalton points to an ESPN poll showing Hispanic fans list the NFL as their favorite American sport. Twenty-six percent of Hispanic fans in the ESPN poll say the NFL is their favorite sport compared to 9 percent each for baseball and basketball. That mirrors other polls of all U.S. sports fans showing the NFL as the most popular sport.

Full story…

NFL, Cardinals top the competition in creating Hispanic fans

ESPN turns Michael Vick into a white man, discusses racism

Friday, August 26th, 2011

(Examiner.com) Ever since Michael Vick got caught fighting and killing dogs, some people inside and outside the African American community have wondered aloud the obvious: Did Michael Vick receive harsh treatment by the media and the judicial system because he’s black?

Now, ESPN The Magazine’s latest op-ed probes deeper into this question. They’ve even posted an illustration of what Michael Vick would look like had he been born to white parents with green eyes.

THE GOOD

Here’s what’s good about this piece. Despite the times we’re living in, race is something no one wants to tackle in a public forum. And in the off chance it is brought up, the conversation usually ends in a brawl worse than what goes down between 49ers and Raiders fans .

 But in the piece entitled “What If Michael Vick Were White,” ESPN attempts to use a mix of fact, opinion and even a few statistics to talk about how Vick’s blackness does, and ironically doesn’t, factor into both his success on the field and the heat he takes off it.

THE BAD

There’s plenty bad about this piece. It’s too brief, too random, and too easy.

Full story…

ESPN turns Michael Vick into a white man, discusses racism

Super Bowl ads lag behind in diversity

Thursday, July 21st, 2011

(Orlando Sentinel) The most prominent event in professional sports is peaking with diversity in almost every area except one – advertising.

In 2010, there were no Super Bowl commercials produced by lead creative directors of color. In 2011, that number rose to four according to the second annual study of the racial and gender makeup of creative directors produced by the University of Central Florida's Institute for Diversity and Ethics in Sport.

Of the 66 total advertisements, 58 agencies made data pertaining to the racial and gender makeup of their creative directors available.

"It's always our goal when we do these type of report cards that they will create change," said Dr. Richard Lapchick, who authored the study.

Overall, just seven percent of ads were produced by creative directors of color and six percent used female creative directors.

These numbers are in sharp contrast to the players, coaches and, namely, audience of the NFL. A record 111 million viewers tuned in to watch the 2011 Super Bowl which included its highest female audience, who represented 51.2 million viewers according to Nielsen demographic data.

Full story…

Super Bowl ads lag behind in diversity
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